A positive attitude

Sexuality and sexual behaviour are sensitive topics. They are part of our most private lives. When a woman asks for emergency contraception, she is disclosing that she had sexual intercourse and that the couple did not use, or had a problem with, their contraception.

When it comes to emergency contraception, some pharmacists can be confronted with his or her own prejudices. It is important to remember that couples and individuals have a right to decide freely and responsibly the timing and number of their children.1 Women who seek emergency contraception are behaving responsibly by taking steps to avoid unintended pregnancy. They need a warm approach. Treating all women in this way is always good practice, especially as some women may have been coerced to have sex (but not necessarily be disclosing this fact to you).

Unprotected sex or contraceptive failure can happen to anyone, for a number of different reasons. 

HRA-Paharmacie-Situations-368 (1280x853)

 

It can happen to anyone
Over a woman’s fertile life it would be most unusual if there were not occasional lapses in contraceptive cover
Love (and sex) are unpredictable, but dealing with unexpected events sensibly is the responsible thing to do
Women may stop their regular contraception for many reasons, including because they have no established partner
Human behaviour is complex and sometimes unpredictable
If she’s having sex she needs reliable contraception – including emergency contraception (provided within national guidelines where they exist)